In reality, it’s impossible to say the best or most famous artists of all time but history has made it easier to classify artists based on their specializations. Their art has stood the test of time and adorned galleries the world over with many of their works worth hundreds of millions of dollars on the rare occasions that they come up for auction. Their art still makes contributions in inspiring the little minds to not hide their talents. Though this article has not segregated the artists on any subject but ranked some of the best and famed artists ever.

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1. Pablo Picasso

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If you think about modern art, Picasso is perhaps the primary name that pops into your head. Art today wouldn’t be the same without him! Pablo Ruiz Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973) was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist and theatre designer who spent most of his adult life in France. Pablo had a very interesting and long life. He lived through two world wars, the invention of electricity, the telephone, the radio and tv, movies and aeroplanes.

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Picasso made all kinds of art and plenty of it. He worked every day for more than eighty years. Some people say he created 50,000 arts! Whoa, that’s amazing! He is also known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the large sort of designs that he helped develop and explore. He made paintings, posters, sculptures in stone and metal, ceramics, drawings, collages, prints, poetry, theater sets, and the list goes on. As a result, the way he painted changed more than any other great artist.

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2. Vincent Van Gogh

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Which artists don’t know the letters of Van Gogh! The letters and artworks of the Dutch painter, Vincent Van Gogh ( 1853-1890) strike at the very heart of desires and emotions we all share. Intensely inquisitive, Van Gogh absorbed the world around him, but the only way he could relate to that would be to create a world of his words and pictures. He was considered a failure and a madman by people. But he wanted to make art that would comfort people using compelling colours and peerless lines. His letters are a masterly account of how he set out to achieve this and what drove him to preserve in this endeavour.

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He is one of the most famous artists of all time, specifically in western art. He made portraits, landscapes, self-portraits, oil paintings, still life with impulsive and expressive brushstrokes. He ended his life at the age of 37 because of mental illness and poverty.

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3. Rembrandt van Rijn

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Rembrandt was a Dutch artist and among the greatest visual artists among the history of arts. Rembrandt’s portraits of his contemporaries, self-portraits and illustrations of scenes from the Bible are considered his greatest creative triumphs.

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He was regarded as the supreme master of etching. For those who have no idea what etching is: the etcher covers a copper plate with an acid-resistant ground, traces his designs in the ground with the help of a needle and exposes the plate to acid. Whenever the ground will be scratched away, the acid will bite semi-circular grooves in the copper. If the plate is then cleaned, inked within the grooves, cleaned again and run through the press with a sheet of paper.

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The forces of creation and insight that made Rembrandt a renowned painter in his era, additionally made him a virtuoso draftsman. Rembrandt inspired numerous Dutch and German painters and even artists throughout Europe.

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4. Leonardo da Vinci

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Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) was an Italian polymath and one of the most talented people ever born. A singular fatality has ruled the destiny of nearly all the foremost famous of Leanardo da Vinci’s works. Two of the three most vital were never completed, obstacles having arisen during his lifetime, which obliged him to go away unfinished; namely the Sforza Monument and therefore the Wall-painting of the battle of Anghiari. Leonardo is widely considered one among the best painters of all time. Mona Lisa is the most famous of his works and therefore the most famous portrait ever made. Do you know, he was known for his technological ingenuity? He conceptualized flying machines, a kind of armoured fighting vehicle, and also contributed within the inventions of helicopters and parachutes.

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5. Michelangelo

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No other artist has had a life so fully documented as that of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). Favoured by and contending with the succession of seven popes in his almost ninety years, he left ample artwork, thoughts, poems for everyone to get inspiration from. Though against the desire of his father, Michelangelo made it plain that art was his early interest. He was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet of the High Renaissance born within the Republic of Florence, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the event of Western art. Several of Michelangelo’s works of painting, sculpture and architecture rank among the foremost famous alive. His output in these fields was prodigious; given the sheer volume of surviving correspondence, sketches and reminiscences, he’s the best-documented artist of the 16th century.

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6. Jackson Pollock

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Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) was such an occasion for American culture. His work was nourished by international roots, but it had been created during a nation and during a society which knew but refused to acknowledge this. Pollock is known as the extreme advocate of non-figurative painting through the enormous publicity which grew up around the drip paintings of the late 1940s and early 1950s. He was widely noticed for his technique of pouring or splashing liquid household paint onto a level (“drip technique”), enabling him to look at and paint his canvases from all angles. It was also called All-over painting and “action painting”, since he covered the whole canvas and used the force of his whole body to colour, often during a frenetic dancing style. He explored the chances for discovery in himself as an artist, and in doing so He embraced, absorbed and expanded all the materials which he instinctively reached for, and which we later find to be pertinent to the work.

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7. Edward Munch

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One thing that can be said about the literary legacy of Edward Munch (1863-1944): it defies generalization. Those who go to Oslo and seek out the work of Edward Munch will find that one of the leanest impressions they can gain of the Norwegian artist’s work is a painting that was done in 1895, probably in Berlin, and which now hangs in the National Gallery. His best-known work, The Scream, has become one among the long-lasting images of world art. He loves travelling and therefore learnt from some of the very prominent artists like Vincent van Gogh. He learned their use of color in Berlin. If you will do the comparisons between his paintings, it will immediately make you clear how far Edward Munch’s artistic travels had already taken him, in just fifteen years, from his Norwegian beginnings.

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8. Henri Matisse

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Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was a french artist, famous for his original draughtsmanship. He was also a printmaker, sculptor but known as a painter. Henri Matisse once spent his summer of 1905 working alongside the artist Andre in the small seaport. The paintings they produced there and exhibited in Paris in the fall gave Matisse and his associates a name: Les Fauves or the wild beasts. This enduringly misleading term was later clarified by Matisse.

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He wrote, “A work of art must carry in itself its complete significance and impose it upon the beholder even before he can identify the subject matter.” Matisse always wanted the colour to be conclusively present in his paintings. His mastery of the expressive language of colour and drawing, displayed during a body of labour spanning over a half-century, won him recognition as a number one figure in modern art.

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9. Frida kahlo

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Maybe the most iconic Mexican artist, the exceptional Frida Kahlo must be our first notice. Frida Kahlo was born in Coyoacán, Mexico, and right off the bat throughout everyday life, she experienced inconveniences polio and what was accepted to be spina bifida. Kahlo’s fine arts regularly addressed difficult stretches she had throughout everyday life, for example, her failure to have youngsters. Quite a bit of her works are self-pictures, and she additionally had a lot of impact from her own Mexican culture, showing numerous distinctive tones and imagery all through her pieces.

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With a list of right around 150 enduring bits of art, most of which are self-pictures that overwhelmingly focus on her complex and frequently disastrous life, just as a religious mainstream society notoriety, Frida Kahlo is an imposing figure of the Mexican workmanship scene. The house which gave testimony regarding her introduction to the world, life and passing is presently the uncontrollably mainstream and much frequented exhibition hall otherwise called La Casa Azul.

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There are many more famous artists whose names might haven’t appeared in this article. Every country has given birth to renowned and eminent artists, painters, print-makers, and sculptors. The list can be never-ending. The fame of the greatest artists goes beyond centuries and people, in general, tend to remember those names more than somebody who didn’t shine too bright, so depending on the common opinion of people throughout the various periods of our history could give a crystal clear answer. Beauty is within the eye of the beholder they assert and that’s true, but if that beauty appears similar in millions of eyes, past and present, well, that is something of significance. After all the work of an artist plays the most crucial role in making him world-famous.

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