Bearing the flag as one of the most culturally rich and regionally diverse society Mexico harbors a socioeconomic division within its population characterized by a blend of the affluent and impoverished. A gargantuan majority being catholic contributed to the prime holidays like the Christmas and Easter to align with the church calendar.

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While the count of the official national holidays are just a handful, the regional celebrations overly compensates for its lack, being nothing short of a roistering fiesta. A prime example being Day of the Dead, which is celebrated particularly in the city of Puebla with a hum of boisterous festivities, marking the day with a themed parade that apart from dishing out national sentiments in the memory of the lamented, garners tourist attention. The zest and gusto with which the events are carried out pitches in to the culture and tradition of the Mexican community.

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The national holidays are statutory and have to be obliged by the schools, bank, government office, post office. The government bodies embodies the responsibilities of scheduling the school and work calendar while Article 74 of Mexico’s federal labor law hegemoniest he public holidays in the country. The law has been revamped in a style that any statutory holiday falling on the weekend will either be postponed or advance back to the visiting Monday or Friday respectively.

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The checklist of the Mexican holidays bears the following days:

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New Year’s Day

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The New Year’s Day holding the celebrated title of Año Nuevo is the first public festivity of the year that props up the hallmark of new beginnings and fresh commencements. The festivities of Mexico represents its nation with its theatrics and exuberance. The day is greeted with ebullience and high spirits with fireworks, wine, music and traditional dishes and is worked with the same ardor and effervescence as the Christmas.

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New Year in Mexico

Constitution Day

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Holding one of most significant and eminent crown in the list of the public holidays, the constitution day entitled Día de la Constitución is symbolized with a trademark parade across Mexico. The parade highlights the Mexican customs by featuring the bands and the marching troops adorning colorful garbs throwing light on the flamboyant Mexican culture. Originally solemnized on the 5th of February it is now commemorated on the first Monday of every February. The draft of the constitution sketched and framed on the fifth of February embodied the significant reforms framing the labor laws equality without discrimination and many others. The day is marked by closing down the banks, schools and the government offices as the Mexicans make a feast out of the holiday by indulging in picnics, festivals, music concerts and street celebrations; basking in the passion and liveliness setting in the surrounding with their loved ones over the extensive weekend.

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Constitution day in Mexico

Birthday of Benito Juarez

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The third national celebration of the year is the birthday of Benito Juarez eulogized on the third Monday of every March. Born on the 21st March of 1806 Juarez lived in an era that stained the history of Mexico with colors of freedom. Designated the title as one of the greatest heroes in the history of Mexico, Benito Juarez is the lawyer and politician who served as the 26th president of Mexico. From campaigning for the rights of the indigenous Mexicans to working on reducing the influence of the catholic churches on politics he toiled towards the greater good of the nation. The liberal tones of his efforts towards establishment of democracy resulted in the modernization of the country. The mantle of Juarez in contributing to the nation’s coalition as republic and its sovereignty is utterly significant and the Mexicans have flaunted their appreciation not only by honoring the twenty peso note with his image but also having almost every Mexican city with a street named after him.

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Benito Juarez

Labor Day

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May 1st is eminent in the history of calendars as the Labor Day and just like many other nations Mexico indulges to accolade its labors by declaring the day as a national rest day for the general population. The nation celebrates the constitution that proclaimed better rights for its laborers who witnessed years of plight marked by the poor working conditions, low wages than their American counterparts and a dearth of respect. The pages of history are tinted with their strikes and revolts calling out on the poor work conditions and corrupt systems. But all were hushed, devoid of any positive consequences. It wasn’t until after the Mexican revolution and the structuring of the constitution that the workers were bestowed with their rightful privileges.

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Maintaining its traditions and customs Mexicans marshal parades and rallies championing for workers right in the main streets by flashing banners vividly supporting the laborers. The laborers take the day off, devoting the time to their loved ones and enjoying the vibrant evening blooming with the festivities.

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Labor Day in Mexico

Independence Day

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An epoch making event in the calendar, the Mexican Independence Day lionized as Día de la Independencia is raved and remarked on the 16th of September every year. After centuries under the foreign rule, the nation ultimately wangled its autonomy and set out on a quest for finding an identity of its own. The day is eminent for every Mexican, celebrating the moment Miguel Hidalgo, a priest and a national leader made the cry of independence (El Grito de la Independencia) in the town of Dolores, Guanajuato. The Mexicans rollick their vigor and zeal swathed in the semblance of extravagant celebrations, parades and procession, fireworks and parties, dance and music alongside traditional food. Decorations in the patriotic colors of red white and green are arrayed spanning across the city streets sprucing up the nationalistic feeling. It’s a sight to behold. The air is alive with cries of “Viva Mexico” and “Viva la Independencia” as whistles are blown and horns are blaster.

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Celebrating Independence Day in Mexico

Revolution Day

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The revolution day, another notch on the national holiday roll is memorialized every year on the third Monday of November and just like any other national festival the Mexicans partake in the customary marches and to further commemorate this day they convene outdoor jamboree cloaked as bazaars, fiestas and festivals and the Mexicans indulge in stories of the revolutionary heroes who helped tailor, revamp and reform Mexico. The tricolored Mexican flag with the national coat of arms is waved with pride marking the diligence of the revolutionary heroes. Festive food are concocted and the atmosphere is jubilated with the cheer of “viva la Revolución!” and “viva Mexico!”

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The day is celebrated to laud the heroes such as Francisco Ignacio Madero, who aided in writing the future of Mexico in bright flamboyant colors by assisting in freeing the nation from the clutches of dictators like Jose de la Cruz Porfirio Diaz who though indulged in panning the nation with order and fetching it out of the chaos it had settled in, gave the economic development a far too higher priority over social justice. 20th November commemorated in the Mexican history as the day Madero denounced President Porfirio Diaz, declaring himself as the president of Mexico.

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Revolution day festivities in Mexico

Christmas Day

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25th of December, the birth of Jesus Christ is espied throughout the world as the Christmas day and is celebrated in Mexico with such zealous euphoria and exuberance that the whole atmosphere is exalted with the festive spirit. A day off for the general public the holiday is catered with the same spirit as any other national holiday in Mexico. The festivities commence from the 16th of December and Mexico is a sight to behold during this time of the year. The entirety of Mexico is immersed in the local culture and tradition, engaged in not just a day but an almost month long festivities comprising of fiestas and carnivals. Blooming with indigenous culture there are candle lit ‘Posada’ parades, Pastorelas and Spanish Christmas carols, fireworks and food, Christmas trees and Santa Claus. The children engage in a enacting the part of the Christmas story, singing the song, recounting the event of Joseph and Mary asking for a lodging. Evergreens, moss and paper lanterns are used to garnish and decorate the posadas (Inn or Lodgings). The Christmas Eve is marked with the final posada parade and the evening is a humdrum of boisterous activity and delicious Christmas meal comprising of delicacies like roast turkey and pozole, tamales and bacalao. Finally ending the day the Mexicans attend the church service at the midnight proclaimed as the ‘Misa de gallo’.

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Christmas celebrations in Mexico

Aside from these customary yearly holidays the nation also faces a day off on the 1st of December every six years when a new president is elected. Besides the national holidays the nation of Mexico also observes many others that are celebrated in only some states such as the Good Friday, Battle of Puebla and the Day of Lady Guadalupe. Every holiday is remarked in traditional Mexican culture and showcases a strong semblance of patriotic endearment.

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